• How to use video to tell your story
    How to use video to tell your story

I’m sure you have seen corporate videos that have made your toes curl.

Unless you have something news-worthy, refrain from filming your CEO talking endlessly to camera – no-one will get past the first 15 seconds.

On the next page are a few pointers every company should consider before embarking on a video project. Get a few angles of your interview subject answering a question and then get close ups of their hands gesticulating that you edit together. There is nothing more boring than one continuous, long, face-on interview.

• Tell a good story – the idea is to keep people interested

• Keep your audience in mind – everyone likes stories they can identify with

• Write your interview questions in advance anticipating your subject’s answer – this will help you to piece a narrative together in the edit

• Prepare a storyline for your video so you know where you’re going

• We consume media at speed these days so keep videos short & snappy or your audience will tune out…fast

• If you’re planning to film at an event like a trade show, make sure you use good sound recording equipment and not just the mic on the camera! If you don’t do this you will pick up every noise in the room, your interviews will be inaudible and you may not be able to cut it with footage that you shot in a quieter location.

• Use a tripod, it’s a corporate video not the Blair Witch Project

• Lighting stops people looking dead and creates warmth and depth. LED light panels are portable, light, battery operated and don’t cost the earth

• If you’re going to be making lots of videos invest in a good DSLR camera. Alternatively, you hire a freelance camera person that will typically bring their own camera and lights

• If you’re filming in an ugly location or want some uniformity, a neutral background will keep your interviews looking polished. That said, sometimes it’s nice to capture people doing what they do best. For example, interviewing a subject at their desk/ workshop/stationary cupboard with bits and bobs in the foreground will create depth and a bit of interest

• Get a few angles of your interview subject answering a question and then get close ups of their hands gesticulating that you edit together. There is nothing more boring than one continuous, face-on interview

• Soft rock sound tracks are not very now… you can buy good audio clips very easily online, which will stop your video sounding like a bad elevator experience

 

 

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